MSU Board of Trustees names Carter to administrative post

Contact: Terry Denbow, Vice President for University Relations, (517) 355-2262, denbow@msu.edu

Sep 21, 2001

EAST LANSING, Mich. - The Michigan State University Board of Trustees today approved the appointment of L. Susan Carter as secretary of the Board of Trustees and executive assistant to the president, effective Jan. 1, 2002.

Nancy Pogel, who has served in the position since 1995, will continue to hold the position until she begins her faculty consulting year and service as senior adviser to the president prior to her retirement from the university.

"Sue Carter has a special set of academic experiences and talents that have prepared her very well for this position," said MSU President Peter McPherson.

"We have been very fortunate to have Nancy Pogel in the position. She has a very special knowledge of and appreciation for the people and programs of MSU. I personally have been the beneficiary of her wise, insightful and pragmatic counsel, and I am grateful that she will continue to be here," he said. "Not only has Nancy been one of the longest-serving administrators in this role at MSU, she has brought to it a standard of excellence in terms of both vision and productivity."

Carter has served as associate professor of journalism since 1997. She received a bachelor's degree in humanities in 1984 from MSU and master's and law degrees from Wayne State University. She is a member of numerous universitywide and College of Communication Arts and Sciences committees, and professional organizations.

At MSU she teaches broadcasting, media law, journalism history and an introductory survey course; she teaches at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. She has conducted research in the areas of interdisciplinary approaches in journalism education, teaching research ethics, improving relations with the fifth estate and women's access to broadcasting. She has served as an adjunct professor at MSU-Detroit College of Law and has taught at Wayne State University and Northern High School in Detroit.

"It is an honor to be selected for this post at MSU. The university has truly been for me an alma mater - as a student, a faculty member and the parent of a student," Carter said. "This new role provides the opportunity to continue giving back to a magnificent university."

She has received several research grants from the United States and Canada, including a Michigan Women's Foundation research grant to produce and distribute a computer game for girls based on Polar Trek 2001, which she led in April. She has also served as a member of Faculty Council and Academic Council in MSU's academic governance system.

Her service in the media involves membership on various editorial boards and panels, including broadcast education coordinator for the 2000 "Push the Edges," a yearlong seminar for Detroit-area journalists funded by the Poynter Institute for Media Studies and the Ford Foundation.

"I've worked with Sue Carter for a number of years in various capacities, and she clearly gives 100 percent to everything she does," said Colleen McNamara, chairperson of MSU Board of Trustees "She has attended board policy discussion sessions and clearly has the understanding and respect for the process and what the position requires."

"We will miss Nancy Pogel very much and commend her for her excellent work," McNamara said.

A faculty member since 1972, Pogel has been active in various efforts to build faculty networks across academic disciplines and worked on the development and implementation of MSU's six "Guiding Principles." She was also instrumental in such programs as "Meet Michigan," which shows faculty members the importance of university outreach.

She is a graduate of Grinnell College in Iowa and received a master's degree in American studies from the University of Wyoming and a doctorate in English from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

"I think Sue Carter is wonderful choice for the position," Pogel said. "She has the knowledge of the university and has earned the respect on the campus community."