William Strampel named dean of MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine

Contact: William D. Strampel, (517) 355-9616; or Tom Oswald, University Relations, (517) 355-2281, oswald@msu.edu

Apr 12, 2002

EAST LANSING, Mich. - William D. Strampel is the new dean of the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine.

With the appointment, which was approved by the MSU Board of Trustees today, Strampel becomes the fourth dean to lead the college. The appointment is effective April 15.

Strampel, who is a professor of internal medicine, has served as the college's acting dean since December 2001. Prior to that he was the college's senior associate dean, a position he held since 1999. He also remains the lead medical director of MSU HealthTeam.

"I'm delighted that someone of Dr. Strampel's caliber can step in and assume leadership of the College of Osteopathic Medicine," said MSU Provost Lou Anna K. Simon. "He brings to the job the perfect balance of clinical and administrative experience. I join the faculty in being confident that he's the right person to lead this college."

Before coming to MSU, Strampel was a special assistant to the U.S. surgeon general for operations and readiness, and served as chief medical officer for the Tricare Management Activity, which made him responsible for a managed care budget of more than $8 billion. He also served as director of quality management in the Office of the Secretary of Defense.

From 1996 through 1997 Strampel was commander of the Brooke Army Medical Center and Great Plains Regional Medical Command, where he was responsible for eight community hospitals and a medical center. From 1994 through 1996 he was director of medical education at Brooke.

From 1991 through 1994 he was chief of the Quality Assurance Division, Department of the Army, Office of the Surgeon General. Prior to 1991 he served in a number of capacities at hospitals in Colorado, Kansas and Korea.

Strampel earned a bachelor's degree from Hope College in 1970 and a D.O. from the Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine in 1976.

Strampel succeeds Allen W. Jacobs, who died in December 2001.